Tricky relative pronouns

Which,” “whom,” and “whose” are relative pronouns that sometimes cause confusion.

Tricky relative pronouns

  1. “Which” often introduces a clause describing an object, animal, or place.

My cell phone, which I bought yesterday, is lost.

  1. “Which” can also introduce a clause describing the whole sentence (not just an object, animal or place) that goes before it.

I’ve lost my cell phone, which means I need to buy another one.

I feel like it was all my fault, which is not very comforting.

  1. “Whom” describes a noun/pronoun that is receiving the action in the clause. It can usually be replaced with “that” or it can be completely removed.

The woman whom Sophie is speaking with is her client.

The woman that Sophie is speaking with is her client.

The woman Sophie is speaking with is her client.

  1. “Whose” talks about ownership. It goes between a noun and the object owned by the noun.

Employees whose promotions have been announced went out to celebrate.

The passenger whose seat you took looks very upset.

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